CAT-CAM Socket with Total Flexible Brim for Pediatric Amputees

TED SNELL, CP**, PAULETTE BUSH, RPT,WILLIAM H. MEYER, MD, AND ROBERT TOOMS, MDMemphis, Tennessee


Since April 1985, Saint Jude Children's Research Hospital has fitted the CATCAM Socket with Total Flexible Brim to 20 patients. Twelve had CAT-CAM as their first definitive prosthesis, and eight have been converted from quadrilateral sockets to the CAT-CAM. CAT-CAM has been well accepted by 18 patients. Acceptance is attributed to 1) improved appearance, 2) increased comfort, and 3) greater control of the prosthesis because of improved alignment. Alignment has been verified radiographically in eight fittings.

Complications occurring with the Total Flexible Brim included four sockets which developed cracks, and four which loosened from the frame. The major disadvantage is the increase in time necessary to fit and align the prosthesis, approximately 10 hours more than for the quadrilateral socket. The technique offers distinct advantages, but technical problems and the increase in fitting time should be considered before the CAT-CAM socket is prescribed.

**Saint Jude Children's Research Hospital, 332 North Lauderdale, Memphis, TN 38101