A Soft Surface Infant Upper Limb Prosthesis

BARB BORTON, O.T.M., DAVID LYTTLE, M.B., AND PAUL OSBORNE, C.P


Parental involvement and acceptance is an integral part of successful upper limb prosthetic fitting and training in children. Ideas and suggestions from parents should be incorporated whenever possible and practical, as active parental commitment from the outset aids in forming a long-term partnership between family and prosthetic team. A six-month old child with congenital transverse deficiency of the distal third of the left humerus attended clinic with her parents. The parents were discouraged by the rigid laminates commonly used and were looking for something with a more natural, warm appearance. With this in mind, the initial prosthesis was sculpted in Plastizote and had a passive infant hand. At age 18 months, an endoskeletal system was fitted with custom nylon elbow and electric hand controlled by a myoelectric system. These prostheses were accepted well by child and parents, mainly because of the soft lifelike surface contours.

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