ACPOC - The Association of Children's Prosthetic-Orthotic Clinics Founded in 1978

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Correlates of Perceived Physical Appearance in Children with Congenital/Acquired Limb Deficiencies

Social support, daily hassles, marital discord, competence/adequacy, and psychological adjustment were investigated as hypothesized correlates of perceived physical appearance in 51 children with congenital or acquired limb deficiencies. Higher classmate, parent, and teacher social support were predictive of higher perceived physical appearance. Higher daily hassles and marital discord were predictive of lower perceived physical appearance. Higher peer acceptance, scholastic competence, and athletic competence were predictive of higher perceived physical appearance. Perceived physical appearance was in turn predictive of higher depressive and anxious symptomatology and lower general self-esteem. The findings are discussed in terms of the potentially modifiable predictors of perceived physical appearance and the role cosmetic differences play in psychological and social adaptation in children with congenital or acquired limb deficiencies.

Child Amputee Prosthetics Project, UCLA Rehabilitation Center, 1000 Veteran Avenue, Los Angeles, CA 90024